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Wednesday, 19 November 2008

CHILDHOOD OBESITY - A BALANCED APPROACH

With the aggressively funded global campaign and the daily marketing ploys disguised as scientific news that we are force fed by the mainstream media on the ‘’obesity epidemic’’, it’s a refreshing change to read a balanced article that helps us reconciliate with medical authorities… or at least some of them.

Surprisingly, this piece of health news comes to us from the UK, one of the most healthist afflicted countries in the world where public health will go to great lengths to coerce people to follow state set standards of what is acceptable and what is not ‘’for your own good’’.

‘’As obesity soars, is it ever OK for your child to be fat?’’ Is the title of the article that we link to below. The answer tends to take a lot of pressure off parents’ shoulders in a country where obese children are being removed from their parents: ’Professor Martin Savage, consultant paediatric endocrinologist at the London Clinic, believes a child who is moderately overweight but not showing any physical disadvantages in routine activities shouldn't be a cause for concern.
'It's when they become abnormally overweight or perhaps experience difficulties doing things such as climbing stairs that it is time to take action,' he says.’’

Not that long ago, this advice would not have even been needed. Simple common sense would have instinctively pushed parents to realize that their child might have a problem, but in a world where health hysteria has taken over with ever-increasing theories, statistics, studies, and consistent anti-obesity propaganda, it has left parents confused and insecure.

Pr Savage goes on explaining that ‘’putting on weight during childhood is an essential part of development since the growing skeleton and building of muscle require a significant level of energy, released from the calories in food’’ and he even recognizes that ‘’ the rate at which youngsters grow, and therefore put on weight, varies from child to child’’. What a novel notion!

As obesity soars, is it ever OK for your child to be fat?

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